Man in the year 3000 may have had a claw-shaped hand and a 90-degree elbow.  (Photo: Free Referral)

This is what the man of the year 3000 would look like due to overuse of technology: hunchback and claw hand

As it is known, people today have become dependent on technology. smart phonesLaptops, smart watches and other electronic devices that allow us to constantly check text messages, email and social networks. While these inventions help us study, work, and socialize, did you know that their overuse could radically change the anatomy of the human body over the next millennium?

“While technology is great for job creation, productivity, and learning new skills, there is growing evidence to suggest the negative effects technology can have on our bodies.”He points to the report of Toll Free Forwarding, an international telecommunications company.

This is based on research, scientific research and opinions of experts on the subject and then converted into 3D images of what a human future would be like due to overuse of these devices.

Mindy is called the 3D created model, it features a hunchback, shrunken neck, claw-shaped hand, right-angled elbow, second inner eyelid, thicker skull and smaller brain. He knows why:

The design and typical habits of users of modern technological objects such as smartphones and computer monitors have a significant impact on the way we sit and stand. In this case, Mindy’s back and neck will bend towards her chest.

Spending hours staring at your phone strains your neck and destabilizes your spine.. As a result, your neck muscles have to work harder to support your head. Sitting for hours in front of a computer in the office also means your torso is stretched out in front of your hips rather than stacked straight and in line.” says Caleb Backe, health and wellness expert at Maple Holistics, who was interviewed for the story.

The connection between technology and posture is now well established, so Mindy’s back and neck (which we’ll discuss in more detail later) are angled towards her chest.

The 3,000-year-old man might have had a hump and a more crooked neck. (Photo: Free Referral)

Mindy’s arm reveals significant anatomical changes resulting from smartphone use. It’s the “text claw” that occurs after someone constantly picks up their smartphone and flexes their fingers in an unnatural position for long periods of time.

“The way we hold our phones can cause stress on certain touchpoints, leading to ‘text snatching'”, explains Dr. Med Alert Help. Nikola Djordjevic. This is known as cubital tunnel syndrome.

Man in the year 3000 may have had a claw-shaped hand and a 90-degree elbow. (Photo: Free Referral)

Mindy’s arm will be at the 90-degree elbow. “smartphone bracket”. This is due to the typical arm position when holding and using smartphones close to our ears for general use or during phone calls.

“Keeping your elbow bent for long periods of time (usually while holding your phone) can stretch the nerve at the back of your elbow and put pressure on it.”explained Dr. Djordjevic.

How can technology affect our brain? There is growing concern about the radio frequency radiation emitted by smartphones and the health consequences they can cause when exposed to the brain.

In 2011, the World Health Organization classified the radiation emitted by smartphones as: “possibly carcinogenic to humans”; and a 2018 study suggested that this type of radiation can affect memory performance. Considering the effect it could have had on all of us, Mindy’s skull got a little thicker, protecting her from harm.

The 3,000-year-old man may have had the smallest hump of the brain.  and the hardest skull.  (Photo: Free Referral)

The 3,000-year-old man may have had the smallest hump of the brain. and the hardest skull. (Photo: Free Referral)

Technology can also change the size of our brain. And thanks to technological advances in agriculture, health and many other areas of life, we now have to do much less to survive.

Mindy’s latest change is arguably the ugliest. As research suggests that screens cause headaches, eyestrain and even blindness, “Mindy’s body may develop a larger inner eyelid to prevent excessive light exposure, or the eye lens may evolve evolutionarily to block incoming blue light.” This was explained by Kasun Ratnayake of the University of Toledo.

Mindy can create a second eyelid or the eye can block blue light from technological devices.  (Photo: Free Referral)

Mindy can create a second eyelid or the eye can block blue light from technological devices. (Photo: Free Referral)

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